Dad of Three

Family_Friends_Art_Design_Architecture_and

the kitchen sink

Haven’t looked at Gizmodo in awhile but so glad I did just now because I came across this video and it is awesome. I had stopped posting but I couldn’t resist getting back on Tumblr to share this. What more do you want? Gorgeous video, amazing dance and a good song. I had to watch it twice and then find out more about the video and the dancer. The top image is from a video for Dreamin’ by Pillar Point.
The second image is from Color of My Mind a film by Daisuke Omiya the dancer and choreographer from the first video. He is amazing.
The Pillar Point video was directed by Wild Combination, I don’t know anything about them except that they make a mean video and are based out of Brooklyn.

All three of these images are from Nadav Kander's Yangtze River work; though everything he does is done amazingly well I think this series is my favorite of his work. Portrait, commercial, fashion, conceptual, digital or documentary-I don't think he knows how to make a bad image.

I came across Dillon Marsh’s work a few days ago and have really been enjoying it. He is a South African photographer working in a documentary typological style certainly influenced by Bernd and Hilla Becher. His website contains 15 galleries that he describes as Landmarks, the above image is from his Invasive Species series in which he documents cell phone towers designed to look like trees. I really love this particular shot as it reminds me of 16th century Dutch landscape painting, Meindert Hobbema’s Wooded Landscape 1663 is shown for comparison.
From Dillon Marsh’s Landmarks statement—“The landscapes we occupy are filled with natural and man-made features that reveal curious details about ourselves and about our relationship with the environment. Although clearly visible and tangible, they often remain hidden in our peripheral vision, occupying the margins of our day to day existence. Landmarks uncovers and explores some of these features and offers new ways of seeing them.”

Five photographers I mentioned in critique today from top to bottom…
The first image is from An Le’s story Come Away With Me featured in Elle VM, next is one of my favorite shots from Chris Hannant’s surfing portfolio, and the photograph of Tyler, Genevieve and their dog Bella is featured as part of Theron Humphrey’s Why We Rescue project. All three of these first photographers are alum of our program here at SCAD. The forth shot is a wet plate collodian image by Robb Kendrick, regular contributor to National Geographic, and the bottom image is one of my favorite Alec Soth images from his book Sleeping by the Mississippi, the image is simply titled Charles, Vasa, Minnesota.

Hmmm, not finding what I was looking for but somehow I stumbled across Adam Magyar’s work which I had seen a few years ago and forgot about. This image is from his series Stainless and can be viewed on his site through an interactive loupe that allows you to see it at full size.  You need to check out the expression of the guy looking out the subway door just to the left of the American flag in the center of the shot, it’s priceless.  All the projects on his sight are really great but I think the Stainless video piece is my favorite.  No on second thought they are all worth looking at, I can’t decide which is my favorite.

Hmmm, not finding what I was looking for but somehow I stumbled across Adam Magyar’s work which I had seen a few years ago and forgot about. This image is from his series Stainless and can be viewed on his site through an interactive loupe that allows you to see it at full size. You need to check out the expression of the guy looking out the subway door just to the left of the American flag in the center of the shot, it’s priceless. All the projects on his sight are really great but I think the Stainless video piece is my favorite. No on second thought they are all worth looking at, I can’t decide which is my favorite.

Since I was talking about Joel Sartore in class today and yesterday I was discussing a series that National Geographic had done, titled The Last of the Last, this seemed like a pretty logical post to go with today.  If you get a chance read the article How We Decide Which Species to Save, I heard some talk about it on NPR and it was pretty interesting.

Since I was talking about Joel Sartore in class today and yesterday I was discussing a series that National Geographic had done, titled The Last of the Last, this seemed like a pretty logical post to go with today. If you get a chance read the article How We Decide Which Species to Save, I heard some talk about it on NPR and it was pretty interesting.

I really wish I could see this in person. Prune Nourry is a contemporary artist from France and her amazing new installation Terracotta Daughters, at Magda Dansysz Gallery in Shanghai, is a wonderful reference to the Terracotta Warriors and to the lower status of daughters in much of china. The girls are all made from only a few casts, so were the warriors, which is not surprising as Nourry is very interested in artificial procreation and bioengineering.

My controlled lighting (studio lighting) class is working on portraits right now and I just saw these images by Toby Dixon.  Not only are they beautiful but they are over the top on the styling, this work is all done in makeup and wardrobe, there is no Photoshop involved.  At the moment he only has two of them on his blog and it looks as if they are shot for a campaign that has not been published yet so he is pretty hush-hush about the work.  Note to all the students out there, I would be hesitant to ever put work up online before a client goes to press with it.

My controlled lighting (studio lighting) class is working on portraits right now and I just saw these images by Toby Dixon. Not only are they beautiful but they are over the top on the styling, this work is all done in makeup and wardrobe, there is no Photoshop involved. At the moment he only has two of them on his blog and it looks as if they are shot for a campaign that has not been published yet so he is pretty hush-hush about the work. Note to all the students out there, I would be hesitant to ever put work up online before a client goes to press with it.

Quoted several things from these books in class this quarter and am just getting around to posting links to them. John Berger’s About Looking and Susan Sontag’s On Photography are great introductions to critical reading about photography. Jeanette Winterson’s Written on the Body had a transformative effect on the way I looked at the human body and its relationship to photography. I hate to talk a book or a movie up to much, every time I am on the receiving end of that I am almost always disappointed, but I think this is a great read and it is a very interesting format for a book.